Discussion:
Singapore law machine to hang
(too old to reply)
Lambada
2005-11-30 01:40:48 UTC
Permalink
***

You dont have to be like a law machine, we R all human being
Give the man a clemency, may peace be with you all .
People designs a machine can be adjustable, so can you

Today is 2005, our planet earth are so difference with 16th century

Speak human language please, like VA Governor's decision, thanks

(fwd)


BREAKING NEWS


This story is from our news.com.au network Source: AAP
back PRINT-FRIENDLY VERSION EMAIL THIS STORY


http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,1741347...

Singapore defends Nguyen hanging


November 30, 2005
SINGAPORE'S High Commissioner in Australia Joseph Koh has defended his
country's decision
to execute convicted drug trafficker Nguyen Tuong Van as correct and
responsible.


In an opinion piece published in Fairfax newspapers today, Mr Koh said
Singapore had not
breached international law, with no existing international agreement to

abolish the death penalty.


"Capital punishment remains part of the criminal justice systems of 76
countries, including
in the United States, where it is practised in 38 states," he said.


"We respect Australia's sovereign choice not to have capital
punishment. We hope Australia
will likewise respect Singapore's sovereign choice to impose the death
penalty for the most
serious crimes, including drug trafficking."


Mr Koh's comments were in direct contradiction to a statement issued by

former Australian
High Court judge and governor-general Sir William Deane yesterday.


Sir William, who commented on the Nguyen case in a "private capacity",
said Friday's planned
execution was a breach of the standards of international law.


"What is involved is the intended execution of an Australian citizen
pursuant to a mandatory
death sentence," Sir William said in the statement.


"That is to say without any true assessment by a court of what
punishment is appropriate
in all the circumstances of the particular case.


"That being so, the proposed killing of Mr Van Nguyen would be a breach

by Singapore of
basic current principles and standards of international law."


But Mr Koh said Australians should accept the Singapore Government's
responsibility to
protect people whose lives would be "blighted and destroyed by the drug

syndicates".


In a piece in which he debunks "fictions" that have sprung up around
the Nguyen case,
Mr Koh said the punishment did fit the crime.


"Mr Nguyen was caught with 396g of pure heroin, enough for 26,000
'hits', with a street
value of more than $A1 million," he wrote.


Other "fictions" were that Nguyen could testify against drug lords,
that Nguyen was an
unsuspecting victim and that the death penalty had not deterred drug
trafficking.


He denied that the Singapore Government "connived with drug lords" and
that Singapore
had treated Australia with contempt.


"Singapore highly values good relations with Australia and with
Australian leaders," he said.


"The Singapore cabinet deliberated at length on Mr Nguyen's clemency
petition... unfortunately,
finally the cabinet decided that it could not justify making an
exception for Mr Nguyen.


"It had to treat Mr Nguyen consistently with similar past cases, and
apply the law equally to
Singaporeans and foreigners."


====== (fwd)

Ohio Executes Man for Two Murders By SARAH ANDERSON, Associated Press
Writer
1 hour, 54 minutes ago

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20051129/ap_on_re_us/ohio_execution_7;_ylt=AsnRWDcw.2cmNMaOnxMMW6IEcP8A;_ylu=X3oDMTBiMW04NW9mBHNlYwMlJVRPUCUl

LUCASVILLE, Ohio - Ohio carried out the nation's 999th execution since
1977 on Tuesday, putting to death a man who strangled his mother-in-law
while high on cocaine and later killed his 5-year-old stepdaughter to
cover up the crime.

ADVERTISEMENT

John Hicks, 49, was put to death a day after Eric Nance was executed in
Arkansas for killing a teenager by slashing her throat with a box
cutter.

The 1,000th execution since the death penalty was reinstated is likely
to come as soon as Wednesday, when Robin Lovitt is set to die in
Virginia for fatally stabbing a man with scissors during a pool hall
robbery.

On Monday, Gov. Bob Taft had refused to commute Hicks' sentence from
death to life in prison, said Andrea Dean, a spokeswoman for the Ohio
Department of Rehabilitation and Correction.

Hicks offered a tearful apology for the 1985 murders in an interview
earlier this month with Ohio Parole Board members, and said he loved
both victims - 56-year-old Maxine Armstrong and 5-year-old Brandy
Green. He detailed the killings and said his cocaine high made him
desperate and paranoid.

Hicks had traded his VCR for about $50 worth of cocaine, court records
show. After taking the drugs, he realized that he needed to get the VCR
back before his wife wondered where it was, so he decided to steal
money from Armstrong.

Hicks found his stepdaughter asleep on the couch at Armstrong's
apartment. He woke her and brought her to bed and then strangled
Armstrong, first with his hands and then with a clothesline.

He left her apartment with about $300 and some credit cards. He used
some of the money to buy back his VCR and purchase more cocaine.

Realizing Green could identify him as the last person at the apartment,
he returned and attempted to suffocate the 5-year-old with a pillow
then strangle her with his hands. She struggled, and Hicks covered her
mouth and nose with duct tape.

He left Cincinnati, but turned himself in to police in Knoxville, Tenn.

Hicks was the fourth person executed in Ohio this year and the 19th
since the state resumed executions in 1999.


Email Story IM Story Discuss Printable View RECOMMEND THIS STORY
Wakalukong
2005-11-30 05:19:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lambada
***
You dont have to be like a law machine, we R all human being
Give the man a clemency, may peace be with you all .
People designs a machine can be adjustable, so can you
Today is 2005, our planet earth are so difference with 16th century
Speak human language please, like VA Governor's decision, thanks
---------------------

You are a kind man and I hate to disappoint you. But Singapore is a
gigantic machine and all decisions are based on cost-benefit analysis.
Your plea of humanity is incomprehensible to us.

Wakalukong

---------------------
Post by Lambada
(fwd)
BREAKING NEWS
This story is from our news.com.au network Source: AAP
back PRINT-FRIENDLY VERSION EMAIL THIS STORY
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,1741347...
Singapore defends Nguyen hanging
November 30, 2005
SINGAPORE'S High Commissioner in Australia Joseph Koh has defended his
country's decision
to execute convicted drug trafficker Nguyen Tuong Van as correct and
responsible.
In an opinion piece published in Fairfax newspapers today, Mr Koh said
Singapore had not
breached international law, with no existing international agreement to
abolish the death penalty.
"Capital punishment remains part of the criminal justice systems of 76
countries, including
in the United States, where it is practised in 38 states," he said.
"We respect Australia's sovereign choice not to have capital
punishment. We hope Australia
will likewise respect Singapore's sovereign choice to impose the death
penalty for the most
serious crimes, including drug trafficking."
Mr Koh's comments were in direct contradiction to a statement issued by
former Australian
High Court judge and governor-general Sir William Deane yesterday.
Sir William, who commented on the Nguyen case in a "private capacity",
said Friday's planned
execution was a breach of the standards of international law.
"What is involved is the intended execution of an Australian citizen
pursuant to a mandatory
death sentence," Sir William said in the statement.
"That is to say without any true assessment by a court of what
punishment is appropriate
in all the circumstances of the particular case.
"That being so, the proposed killing of Mr Van Nguyen would be a breach
by Singapore of
basic current principles and standards of international law."
But Mr Koh said Australians should accept the Singapore Government's
responsibility to
protect people whose lives would be "blighted and destroyed by the drug
syndicates".
In a piece in which he debunks "fictions" that have sprung up around
the Nguyen case,
Mr Koh said the punishment did fit the crime.
"Mr Nguyen was caught with 396g of pure heroin, enough for 26,000
'hits', with a street
value of more than $A1 million," he wrote.
Other "fictions" were that Nguyen could testify against drug lords,
that Nguyen was an
unsuspecting victim and that the death penalty had not deterred drug
trafficking.
He denied that the Singapore Government "connived with drug lords" and
that Singapore
had treated Australia with contempt.
"Singapore highly values good relations with Australia and with
Australian leaders," he said.
"The Singapore cabinet deliberated at length on Mr Nguyen's clemency
petition... unfortunately,
finally the cabinet decided that it could not justify making an
exception for Mr Nguyen.
"It had to treat Mr Nguyen consistently with similar past cases, and
apply the law equally to
Singaporeans and foreigners."
====== (fwd)
Ohio Executes Man for Two Murders By SARAH ANDERSON, Associated Press
Writer
1 hour, 54 minutes ago
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20051129/ap_on_re_us/ohio_execution_7;_ylt=AsnRWDcw.2cmNMaOnxMMW6IEcP8A;_ylu=X3oDMTBiMW04NW9mBHNlYwMlJVRPUCUl
LUCASVILLE, Ohio - Ohio carried out the nation's 999th execution since
1977 on Tuesday, putting to death a man who strangled his mother-in-law
while high on cocaine and later killed his 5-year-old stepdaughter to
cover up the crime.
ADVERTISEMENT
John Hicks, 49, was put to death a day after Eric Nance was executed in
Arkansas for killing a teenager by slashing her throat with a box
cutter.
The 1,000th execution since the death penalty was reinstated is likely
to come as soon as Wednesday, when Robin Lovitt is set to die in
Virginia for fatally stabbing a man with scissors during a pool hall
robbery.
On Monday, Gov. Bob Taft had refused to commute Hicks' sentence from
death to life in prison, said Andrea Dean, a spokeswoman for the Ohio
Department of Rehabilitation and Correction.
Hicks offered a tearful apology for the 1985 murders in an interview
earlier this month with Ohio Parole Board members, and said he loved
both victims - 56-year-old Maxine Armstrong and 5-year-old Brandy
Green. He detailed the killings and said his cocaine high made him
desperate and paranoid.
Hicks had traded his VCR for about $50 worth of cocaine, court records
show. After taking the drugs, he realized that he needed to get the VCR
back before his wife wondered where it was, so he decided to steal
money from Armstrong.
Hicks found his stepdaughter asleep on the couch at Armstrong's
apartment. He woke her and brought her to bed and then strangled
Armstrong, first with his hands and then with a clothesline.
He left her apartment with about $300 and some credit cards. He used
some of the money to buy back his VCR and purchase more cocaine.
Realizing Green could identify him as the last person at the apartment,
he returned and attempted to suffocate the 5-year-old with a pillow
then strangle her with his hands. She struggled, and Hicks covered her
mouth and nose with duct tape.
He left Cincinnati, but turned himself in to police in Knoxville, Tenn.
Hicks was the fourth person executed in Ohio this year and the 19th
since the state resumed executions in 1999.
Email Story IM Story Discuss Printable View RECOMMEND THIS STORY
news.news
2005-11-30 13:13:23 UTC
Permalink
I believe Austrilia is no different from Singapore!
Post by Wakalukong
Post by Lambada
***
You dont have to be like a law machine, we R all human being
Give the man a clemency, may peace be with you all .
People designs a machine can be adjustable, so can you
Today is 2005, our planet earth are so difference with 16th century
Speak human language please, like VA Governor's decision, thanks
---------------------
You are a kind man and I hate to disappoint you. But Singapore is a
gigantic machine and all decisions are based on cost-benefit analysis.
Your plea of humanity is incomprehensible to us.
Wakalukong
---------------------
Post by Lambada
(fwd)
BREAKING NEWS
This story is from our news.com.au network Source: AAP
back PRINT-FRIENDLY VERSION EMAIL THIS STORY
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,1741347...
Singapore defends Nguyen hanging
November 30, 2005
SINGAPORE'S High Commissioner in Australia Joseph Koh has defended his
country's decision
to execute convicted drug trafficker Nguyen Tuong Van as correct and
responsible.
In an opinion piece published in Fairfax newspapers today, Mr Koh said
Singapore had not
breached international law, with no existing international agreement to
abolish the death penalty.
"Capital punishment remains part of the criminal justice systems of 76
countries, including
in the United States, where it is practised in 38 states," he said.
"We respect Australia's sovereign choice not to have capital
punishment. We hope Australia
will likewise respect Singapore's sovereign choice to impose the death
penalty for the most
serious crimes, including drug trafficking."
Mr Koh's comments were in direct contradiction to a statement issued by
former Australian
High Court judge and governor-general Sir William Deane yesterday.
Sir William, who commented on the Nguyen case in a "private capacity",
said Friday's planned
execution was a breach of the standards of international law.
"What is involved is the intended execution of an Australian citizen
pursuant to a mandatory
death sentence," Sir William said in the statement.
"That is to say without any true assessment by a court of what
punishment is appropriate
in all the circumstances of the particular case.
"That being so, the proposed killing of Mr Van Nguyen would be a breach
by Singapore of
basic current principles and standards of international law."
But Mr Koh said Australians should accept the Singapore Government's
responsibility to
protect people whose lives would be "blighted and destroyed by the drug
syndicates".
In a piece in which he debunks "fictions" that have sprung up around
the Nguyen case,
Mr Koh said the punishment did fit the crime.
"Mr Nguyen was caught with 396g of pure heroin, enough for 26,000
'hits', with a street
value of more than $A1 million," he wrote.
Other "fictions" were that Nguyen could testify against drug lords,
that Nguyen was an
unsuspecting victim and that the death penalty had not deterred drug
trafficking.
He denied that the Singapore Government "connived with drug lords" and
that Singapore
had treated Australia with contempt.
"Singapore highly values good relations with Australia and with
Australian leaders," he said.
"The Singapore cabinet deliberated at length on Mr Nguyen's clemency
petition... unfortunately,
finally the cabinet decided that it could not justify making an
exception for Mr Nguyen.
"It had to treat Mr Nguyen consistently with similar past cases, and
apply the law equally to
Singaporeans and foreigners."
====== (fwd)
Ohio Executes Man for Two Murders By SARAH ANDERSON, Associated Press
Writer
1 hour, 54 minutes ago
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20051129/ap_on_re_us/ohio_execution_7;_ylt=AsnRWDcw.2cmNMaOnxMMW6IEcP8A;_ylu=X3oDMTBiMW04NW9mBHNlYwMlJVRPUCUl
LUCASVILLE, Ohio - Ohio carried out the nation's 999th execution since
1977 on Tuesday, putting to death a man who strangled his mother-in-law
while high on cocaine and later killed his 5-year-old stepdaughter to
cover up the crime.
ADVERTISEMENT
John Hicks, 49, was put to death a day after Eric Nance was executed in
Arkansas for killing a teenager by slashing her throat with a box
cutter.
The 1,000th execution since the death penalty was reinstated is likely
to come as soon as Wednesday, when Robin Lovitt is set to die in
Virginia for fatally stabbing a man with scissors during a pool hall
robbery.
On Monday, Gov. Bob Taft had refused to commute Hicks' sentence from
death to life in prison, said Andrea Dean, a spokeswoman for the Ohio
Department of Rehabilitation and Correction.
Hicks offered a tearful apology for the 1985 murders in an interview
earlier this month with Ohio Parole Board members, and said he loved
both victims - 56-year-old Maxine Armstrong and 5-year-old Brandy
Green. He detailed the killings and said his cocaine high made him
desperate and paranoid.
Hicks had traded his VCR for about $50 worth of cocaine, court records
show. After taking the drugs, he realized that he needed to get the VCR
back before his wife wondered where it was, so he decided to steal
money from Armstrong.
Hicks found his stepdaughter asleep on the couch at Armstrong's
apartment. He woke her and brought her to bed and then strangled
Armstrong, first with his hands and then with a clothesline.
He left her apartment with about $300 and some credit cards. He used
some of the money to buy back his VCR and purchase more cocaine.
Realizing Green could identify him as the last person at the apartment,
he returned and attempted to suffocate the 5-year-old with a pillow
then strangle her with his hands. She struggled, and Hicks covered her
mouth and nose with duct tape.
He left Cincinnati, but turned himself in to police in Knoxville, Tenn.
Hicks was the fourth person executed in Ohio this year and the 19th
since the state resumed executions in 1999.
Email Story IM Story Discuss Printable View RECOMMEND THIS STORY
Wakalukong
2005-12-01 04:15:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by news.news
I believe Austrilia is no different from Singapore!
------------------------

I think Australians understand that they can ask, "Is the law right?
Should we have such a law?" But Singaporeans don't.

Also, when it comes to applying rules and procedures mechanically,
Singapore is world champion.

So, I think Australians are a bit different.

Wakalukong

-------------------------
Post by news.news
Post by Wakalukong
Post by Lambada
***
You dont have to be like a law machine, we R all human being
Give the man a clemency, may peace be with you all .
People designs a machine can be adjustable, so can you
Today is 2005, our planet earth are so difference with 16th century
Speak human language please, like VA Governor's decision, thanks
---------------------
You are a kind man and I hate to disappoint you. But Singapore is a
gigantic machine and all decisions are based on cost-benefit analysis.
Your plea of humanity is incomprehensible to us.
Wakalukong
---------------------
Post by Lambada
(fwd)
BREAKING NEWS
This story is from our news.com.au network Source: AAP
back PRINT-FRIENDLY VERSION EMAIL THIS STORY
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,1741347...
Singapore defends Nguyen hanging
November 30, 2005
SINGAPORE'S High Commissioner in Australia Joseph Koh has defended his
country's decision
to execute convicted drug trafficker Nguyen Tuong Van as correct and
responsible.
In an opinion piece published in Fairfax newspapers today, Mr Koh said
Singapore had not
breached international law, with no existing international agreement to
abolish the death penalty.
"Capital punishment remains part of the criminal justice systems of 76
countries, including
in the United States, where it is practised in 38 states," he said.
"We respect Australia's sovereign choice not to have capital
punishment. We hope Australia
will likewise respect Singapore's sovereign choice to impose the death
penalty for the most
serious crimes, including drug trafficking."
Mr Koh's comments were in direct contradiction to a statement issued by
former Australian
High Court judge and governor-general Sir William Deane yesterday.
Sir William, who commented on the Nguyen case in a "private capacity",
said Friday's planned
execution was a breach of the standards of international law.
"What is involved is the intended execution of an Australian citizen
pursuant to a mandatory
death sentence," Sir William said in the statement.
"That is to say without any true assessment by a court of what
punishment is appropriate
in all the circumstances of the particular case.
"That being so, the proposed killing of Mr Van Nguyen would be a breach
by Singapore of
basic current principles and standards of international law."
But Mr Koh said Australians should accept the Singapore Government's
responsibility to
protect people whose lives would be "blighted and destroyed by the drug
syndicates".
In a piece in which he debunks "fictions" that have sprung up around
the Nguyen case,
Mr Koh said the punishment did fit the crime.
"Mr Nguyen was caught with 396g of pure heroin, enough for 26,000
'hits', with a street
value of more than $A1 million," he wrote.
Other "fictions" were that Nguyen could testify against drug lords,
that Nguyen was an
unsuspecting victim and that the death penalty had not deterred drug
trafficking.
He denied that the Singapore Government "connived with drug lords" and
that Singapore
had treated Australia with contempt.
"Singapore highly values good relations with Australia and with
Australian leaders," he said.
"The Singapore cabinet deliberated at length on Mr Nguyen's clemency
petition... unfortunately,
finally the cabinet decided that it could not justify making an
exception for Mr Nguyen.
"It had to treat Mr Nguyen consistently with similar past cases, and
apply the law equally to
Singaporeans and foreigners."
====== (fwd)
Ohio Executes Man for Two Murders By SARAH ANDERSON, Associated Press
Writer
1 hour, 54 minutes ago
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20051129/ap_on_re_us/ohio_execution_7;_ylt=AsnRWDcw.2cmNMaOnxMMW6IEcP8A;_ylu=X3oDMTBiMW04NW9mBHNlYwMlJVRPUCUl
LUCASVILLE, Ohio - Ohio carried out the nation's 999th execution since
1977 on Tuesday, putting to death a man who strangled his mother-in-law
while high on cocaine and later killed his 5-year-old stepdaughter to
cover up the crime.
ADVERTISEMENT
John Hicks, 49, was put to death a day after Eric Nance was executed in
Arkansas for killing a teenager by slashing her throat with a box
cutter.
The 1,000th execution since the death penalty was reinstated is likely
to come as soon as Wednesday, when Robin Lovitt is set to die in
Virginia for fatally stabbing a man with scissors during a pool hall
robbery.
On Monday, Gov. Bob Taft had refused to commute Hicks' sentence from
death to life in prison, said Andrea Dean, a spokeswoman for the Ohio
Department of Rehabilitation and Correction.
Hicks offered a tearful apology for the 1985 murders in an interview
earlier this month with Ohio Parole Board members, and said he loved
both victims - 56-year-old Maxine Armstrong and 5-year-old Brandy
Green. He detailed the killings and said his cocaine high made him
desperate and paranoid.
Hicks had traded his VCR for about $50 worth of cocaine, court records
show. After taking the drugs, he realized that he needed to get the VCR
back before his wife wondered where it was, so he decided to steal
money from Armstrong.
Hicks found his stepdaughter asleep on the couch at Armstrong's
apartment. He woke her and brought her to bed and then strangled
Armstrong, first with his hands and then with a clothesline.
He left her apartment with about $300 and some credit cards. He used
some of the money to buy back his VCR and purchase more cocaine.
Realizing Green could identify him as the last person at the apartment,
he returned and attempted to suffocate the 5-year-old with a pillow
then strangle her with his hands. She struggled, and Hicks covered her
mouth and nose with duct tape.
He left Cincinnati, but turned himself in to police in Knoxville, Tenn.
Hicks was the fourth person executed in Ohio this year and the 19th
since the state resumed executions in 1999.
Email Story IM Story Discuss Printable View RECOMMEND THIS STORY
Lambada
2005-11-30 15:30:28 UTC
Permalink
***

(fwd) http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/425822/634398

Nguyen denied hug with family


Related Articles

Condemned Australian 'ready to die'

Nov 30, 2005

An Australian drug courier who is due to be hanged in Singapore on
Friday has not been allowed to embrace his mother or twin brother and
will not donate his organs for transplant, his lawyer said on
Wednesday.

Nguyen Tuong Van, a 25-year-old salesman from Melbourne who was caught
with 400 grams (0.9 lb) of heroin while in transit in Singapore, has
not heard whether he will be able to have physical contact with his
family before he dies, lawyer Lex Lasry said.

"There is just no basis on which the family shouldn't be consoled with
at least some level of physical contact with a brother and son," Lasry
told reporters as he emerged from an 80-minute visit with Nguyen in
Changi prison.

Prisoners on death row in Singapore are separated from visitors by a
thick pane of glass and have to communicate via telephone, according to
a 2004 Amnesty International report about the death penalty in
Singapore.

Amnesty also said that about four days before the execution date
prisoners are allowed extra visits from relatives, but that no physical
contact is permitted at any time before the execution.

Singapore's prison service would not immediately comment.

As a special concession in their last four days, prisoners are allowed
to watch TV or listen to the radio and are given meals of their choice,
within the prison's budget, Amnesty said.

Nguyen's mother, Kim Nguyen, arrived at the prison in the afternoon,
holding hands with Nguyen's twin brother, Khoa.

"She is very distressed. But I think she realises that this is
something she has to come to terms with," said Lasry.

The family has made no public comments in the past few weeks.

Asked whether Nguyen would be donating his organs for medical use,
Lasry said: "I am confident there won't be any donation."

On Monday, executioner Darshan Singh told Reuters convicts on death row
can chose whether or not to donate their organs.

Death by hanging does not damage vital organs, unlike execution by
lethal injection, Singh said.

It is not clear who will execute Nguyen after Singh said on Sunday he
had been sacked and would not be required for further executions after
speaking to the Australian media.

Nguyen will be executed by "long-drop hanging", an execution method
inherited from British colonial days.

Long-drop hanging was introduced in the late 19th century as a more
humane form of hanging compared to the short-drop hangings that are
still practiced in some countries. Convicts drop several feet and die
when the spinal cord snaps, not by asphyxiation.

The Amnesty report said that about 420 people had been hanged in
Singapore since 1991, mostly for drug trafficking, giving the
city-state of 4.4 million people the highest execution rate in the
world relative to population.

The Australian government has made repeated appeals for clemency, with
Prime Minister John Howard talking to his Singaporean counterpart five
times.

But Singapore has stood firm, saying Nguyen was caught with a large
amount of heroin and that the government would not allow Singapore to
be used as a transit for illicit drugs.
Lambada
2005-12-01 19:41:21 UTC
Permalink
***
Why Singaporeans are so willingly to kill the man
in the transit lounge air port with his heroin to carry
to Austria destinaton ? Let AU handle her own crime
by deport him back to AU according to international law

By now, Mr Nguen Tuong Van is near to death by
the Humainity Law of Singapore of hanging. I light a candle for
him, may peace and God be with you

(fwd)

WORLD NEWS


http://www.thecouriermail.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5936,17432290%255E954,00.html

back PRINT-FRIENDLY VERSION EMAIL THIS STORY


COMPOSED and thinking good things . . . Nguyen Tuong Van.


Mum held Nguyen's hand for last time
Jamie Walker in Singapore
02dec05
NGUYEN Tuong Van was due to be woken by his guards at 4am today in
Singapore's Changi Prison.

But with only hours of his young life left, it was doubtful the
Melbourne man would have slept at all.

The countdown to his execution at 8am Queensland time was to begin with
Nguyen showering and being served a simple breakfast of bread, fruit
and coffee. A Catholic priest was due to come to his cell to pray with
him.

His last moments were expected to proceed as things do in Singapore:
methodically, with almost sterile efficiency.

The one comfort he was permitted yesterday was to hold hands with his
heartbroken mother, Kim, and twin brother, Khoa.


Mrs Nguyen had wanted to hug her son, but her request for physical
contact was rejected because the Singaporeans consider it to be too
destabilising. Only after an appeal by Prime Minister John Howard, did
local authorities agree to allow the condemned man to touch hands with
his mother, a pitifully sad gesture of goodbye.

As is the practice in Singapore, no outside witnesses were to be
present at Nguyen's hanging.

His lawyers Lex Lasry, QC, and Julian McMahon continued to fight to the
bitter end, making last-ditch pleas to senior Singaporean Government
officials yesterday in a seemingly futile effort to secure a reprieve.

After his final visit with Nguyen, an emotional Mr Lasry said: "I think
the thing that strikes me about this is that we are looking into the
eyes of a healthy, 25-year-old man with so much to offer, who is going
to die a violent death."

Mr McMahon described Nguyen's state of mind as "beautiful" and said he
was cheerful and composed.

"He only wishes to think good thoughts, say good things and do what is
right," Mr McMahon said.

"He is completely rehabilitated, completely reformed, completely
focused on doing what is good and now they are going to kill him."

Nguyen said farewell to his mother, brother, and school friends,
Bronwyn Lew and Kelly Ng, in a four-hour meeting yesterday before being
returned to his isolation cell.
Mrs Nguyen left the jail, her head covered by a white scarf.

She was escorted to a waiting car, along with Khoa, by Australian
embassy officials who wrapped their arms around the distraught woman.

It was the last time she was to see her condemned son.

Local lawyer and anti-death penalty campaigner M. Ravi said Nguyen's
legal team should have still applied to a court to give Mrs Nguyen the
comfort of hugging her son.

"No judge in Singapore would stop a mother from doing that," he said.

"The courts are not that cruel."

Mr Ravi has had two clients executed under Singapore's mandatory death
policy for hard drug trafficking and knows the routine of those final
harrowing hours on Changi's death row.

Nguyen has been in Changi for the past three years since he was
arrested with almost 400g of heroin. He had been trying to board a
Qantas flight to Melbourne with the drugs strapped to his body and
inside his hand luggage, but it was discovered as he walked through a
metal detector.

Baring the near-miracle of a death's-door reprieve, Nguyen would be
dressed in standard prison garb of white shirt and shorts before being
taken to a holding cell about 20m from the gallows.

As dawn broke, he would have been told it was time.

A black hood would be pulled over his head and his hands cuffed behind
his back.

Four guards would have escorted him to the gallows where, according to
Mr Ravi, a nylon noose was to be fitted around his neck.

Between 6 and 6.30am (local time), justice Singapore-style would have
been done.



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NATIONAL NEWS

http://www.thecouriermail.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5936,17431929%255E953,00.html


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OVERCOME . . . a distraught Kim Nguyen is comforted by Liz Lasry, wife
of lawyer Lex Lasry, after visiiting for the last time her condemned
son Tuong Van Nguyen at Singapore's Changi Prison yesterday.


Nguyen hanging to traumatise guards
Russell Robinson in Singapore
02dec05
GUARDS on death row in Singapore's Changi prison will be "very upset"
by the execution of Nguyen Tuong Van, according to the lawyer of the
convicted Melbourne drug trafficker.
Lex Lasry, QC, said the guards had cared for Nguyen and treated him
like a son.

"They're going to be very upset," he said.

"They work in death row on the ground and they feel it. Van and these
men have a great relationship and I've seen evidence of it during the
course of our visits.

"Yesterday, a couple of prison officers arrived with a bag of food for
him, which was chocolates and those sorts of things. That's the way
they try to bestow some sort of privileges on him."

Nguyen was to be executed at 6am (8am Queensland time) today, after
spending his final night praying with a priest.

"He loves the 23rd Psalm and that will figure in the last hours," Mr
Lasry said.

"He's determined to go out with strength and optimism."

Speaking just hours after paying his last visit with Nguyen, Mr Lasry
said the young Australian would not be shackled when taken to the
gallows.

"He'll walk to the gallows and he'll walk confidently," he said.

"He'll have Rosary beads and he'll have people with him. He genuinely
thinks he's going somewhere good."

Nguyen's body will be taken from the prison several hours after the
execution, when he is pronounced dead and a formal identification of
the body is made.

A special vehicle, arranged by the Australian embassy and his lawyers,
will then take Nguyen's body out of the prison to prepare for the
flight home to Melbourne where a special funeral service will be held.

Mr Lasry last night reflected on his relationship with the client he
and their supporters simply call Van. He said Nguyen had been spending
considerable time writing letters to his family, friends and
supporters.

"His cell, which he calls his room, is filled with photographs and
writing gear all around," Mr Lasry said.

"He told Julian McMahon (his other Melbourne lawyer) that he measures
his time in jail by the time that a Biro lasts, which is 16 to 18 days.


"Of course, that's over."

His twin brother Khoa spent considerable time visiting him yesterday,
wearing all-white clothes, the traditional symbol of mourning.

When he was arrested three years ago with almost 400g of heroin
strapped to his body and inside his hand luggage, Nguyen claimed he had
acted as a drug mule to help pay Khoa's debts.

Yesterday, Mr Lasry said Khoa, who has maintained his silence, was
feeling "somewhat solitary" and wanting some time to himself.

"It must be terribly difficult for him, particularly as he looks to his
future and particularly being a twin," he said. "I think the wrench
that will be involved in the death of his brother will be amazing."

Mr Lasry said before the trial he offered to plead to a charge which
would have given Nguyen more than 20 years behind bars.

"For a boy of 22, it's a pretty savage sentence, and it's way in excess
of any sentence a judge would impose in Australia," he said. "And the
fact it's in Singapore doesn't make it right."

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